ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL CRIMES COMMISSION, ITS POLICIES AND CORRUPTION IN NIGERIA, 2003 TO 2010

Price: 2000 Naira

ABSTRACT


Corruption has remained a thorn on the flesh of Nigeria’s economic, political and, social life in
spite of the concerted efforts made to curb the menace by different regimes. In 2002, the
Obasanjo’s Regime enacted the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission’s (EFCC) Act,
while the Agency commenced duties with its plans of actions (policies) in 2003. Still, corruption
was on the increase. The situation raised our concern to carry out a research work to examine
Economic and Financial Crimes in Nigeria between 2003 to 2010. This research work has two
questions which are: (a) Did EFCC’s activities (policies) strengthen the fight against corruption
between 2003 to 2010? (b) Did EFCC effectively succeed in reducing corruption between 2003
to 2010? The two hypotheses tested in this research work are: (a) Political interference in the
EFCC’s activities weakened the fight against corruption between 2003 to 2010, (b) Political
interference in the EFCC’s policies undermined the EFCC’s effectiveness in reducing corruption
between 2003 to 2010. We adopted structural functionalism as our theoretical framework and,
used observational technique and qualitative descriptive method as our methods of data
collection and analysis respectively. The first hypothesis was tested in chapter three, under the
sub-heading, Obasanjo’s Regime (1999-2007), and we found out that such cases as the N81
billion Identity Card scam, the uninvestigated N250, 000 credited into the accounts of the
members of the National Assembly, the EI-Rufai’s Privatization scandal, the Julius
Makanjuola’s case, the many private establishments owned by Obasanjo etc, which were not
investigated by the EFCC due to Presidential involvement, interference and, fear of indictment
confirmed our hypothesis that political interference in the EFCC’s activities weakened the fight
against corruption. The second hypothesis was tested in chapter four which has the headingEFCC’s Policies, Performances and Challenges. Under which we found out that the poor
position of Nigeria in the Transparency International Corruption Perception Index, the use of the
EFCC to destroy enemies and protect associates etc, confirmed our hypothesis that political
interference in the EFCC’s policies undermined the EFCC’s effectiveness in reducing corruption.
We concluded that EFCC was established to serve the interests of the ‘powers that be’. And that
the use of the EFCC to protect the interests of the ‘powers that be’ weakened the EFCC’s
activities and, undermined the EFCC’s effectiveness in reducing corruption in Nigeria between
2003 to 2010. We proffered recommendations that, there is need to strengthen the independences
of the EFCC and, empower complementary governmental agencies and civil society
organizations so as to engender the feelings of ownership of the war. If the government and the
EFCC would accept and implement these recommendations, they would enhance the Agency’s
(EFCC) effectiveness and efficiency.

Get Full Materials

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.